When Names You Love Mean Bad Things

Which names do you love, but can’t fight how you feel about a

“bad” meaning?

Judy asked:

What happens when you’re not keen on a name meaning? I’m not set on a girl’s name, but like Cecelia. From what I find, it means, “blind.” I’m just not diggin’ it. How does one reconcile this? New name? Bend the meaning a little (like, I could say I hoped she would be blind to differences or blind to obstacles that hold one back or blind to colors that keep people apart, etc). Thoughts?

For me, it is sometimes a deal-breaker. A name is like a wish you make for your child, and it’s one of the first gifts you give to them. Children do often embody their names, so if something is too negative I might strike it off my list. The same way you feel about Cecelia brings to mind the feelings I have for Claudia (“lame”). Geraldine on our page recently disliked the suggestion we gave of Maeve (“intoxicating”, by most counts), feeling it was too negative.

There are a few ways to reconcile this, in my mind.
1. Strike the name off your list.
2. Pair it with a name that gives the total meaning something beautiful or easier to appreciate. Remember, names are like poetry… and you are the poet.

Name Alchemy: when life gives you lemons, make lemonade, lemon water, or anything you can imagine.

3. Find out more about the name. I recommend doing this anyway, for any name you are serious about choosing or keeping on your list. Names often have surprising histories, including meanings that seemed negative, only to find in context, they are beautiful. Of course, the reverse is often true, which is why I recommend researching even the most pleasant of names before definitively using it on your child.

So, let’s see these in action for a moment.

Let’s take Cecelia. Obviously, the first thing you could do is strike it off your list, if you felt so inclined. That’s suggestion Number 1 in action.

The next option is a little like your idea, Judy, of “bending” the meaning a little (which honestly may not be much of a stretch, anyway). It wouldn’t really be too difficult to give a positive spin to “blind”, as you suggested, and it can be even more descriptive when you factor in a middle-name meaning to go with it. Angel, a fan on our page, suggested adding a meaning that would make a phrase you love, such as “love is blind” or “justice is blind”. Those are positives, or can be in many ways. You could literally combine Love or Justice with Cecelia in a first and middle baby name combo, or you could do something figurative or symbolic. You could create a name that signifies miracles by combining Raphaelle (“healed by God”) with Cecelia, and suddenly you have the blind being healed by God. Cecelia Raphaelle just became your “name alchemy”.

St. Cecilia in Pre-Raphaelite art. Painting by John Waterhouse.

Of course, you can always find out more. Most sources indicate Cecelia (or more usually spelled Cecilia) is from the Latin root caecus, for blind. This is then sometimes romanticized to mean “the way for the blind”. However, could this be true? Wikipedia claims that Cecilia is an altered form more closely related to French and archaic French words céscelisme and céciaelism (respectively), which actually mean “one of the shining light” or “one of the world”. I’m having trouble confirming this (French scholars, I could use you right now!), but if this is true, it would make a lot of sense– Cecilia wouldn’t mean “blind”, it would mean “showing the way to the blind”. She would be like a shining light to help people see. Hypothetically. Just looking at the root words, it definitely seems to contain “cecil” (blind) and “ism” (the way of). Seems legit?

I couldn’t verify Wiki’s info this time, but if it isn’t accurate, it’s a great bluff.

Barring that, let me tell you that the Latin “caecus” doesn’t just mean “blind”, it means “hidden”. You could most certainly take “hidden” to be an alternate interpretation of Cecilia.  This is how you can research the names more to discover the meanings are more than what they appear.

Cecilia: “hidden”. Names can literally or figuratively have hidden meanings.

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6 responses

  1. Just wanted to say that EVERYONE I know wth the name Marie in their name somewhere, has a bitter streak in their personalities. Including me, and my DD. I didnt know it meant Bitter… but oh well!

  2. I’m reading back through old blog entries after finding this blog, and I wanted to comment that my sister just had her first and literally did the second option with Cecilia! They used Cecilia Jane for the blended meaning “blinded by the grace of God.”

    Also, I loved Leah as a middle for my daughter because I love Leah in the Bible, but it means “weary.” Her name is Lucy Leah Charlotte for the meaning “a free light to the weary.”

    I’m loving this blog!

  3. Pingback: Cowboy Prairie Style First & Middle Baby Name Combos | First & Middle Baby Names

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